How to Prevent Sweat Marks

Sweat marks can be a nightmare to deal with, especially when you’ve got an important meeting at work or a big party to attend. So here are our top tips to prevent sweat marks.

Tips for what you wear

  • Wait for your antiperspirant to dry fully. This is especially true if you’re using a roll-on product, which is very moist. Also, experiment with amounts you’re applying—you might be applying too much at one time, or reapplying too frequently.
  • Bare your feet (almost). Where it’s appropriate, wear sandals or open-toed shoes, and when you’re home, try to go barefoot.
  • Tie back long hair. In buns, braids or ponytails. The air will circulate better around your neck and face.
  • Choose fabrics wisely. Wear light-weight and breathable fabrics, like cotton, linen and wool. Avoid polyester and synthetic fabrics, as they trap heat and sweat.
  • Go dark. Wear darker colors or vibrant prints. If you do sweat through your clothes, patches and stains will be less noticeable.
  • Hem your pants so the ankle can breathe, or wear shorts or cropped pants for the best circulation.

Tips for where you are

  • Stay cool. With a fan, or strong air conditioning.
  • Keep a cool spray bottle handy in the fridge during the day.
  • Stay out of the sun. Don’t sit in direct sunlight—if you’re by a window, try anti-glare or light-filtering blinds. They block out the sun’s glare while still allowing light in. And when you’re going out, close your blinds so your home doesn’t heat up.
  • End the day cold. Take a cool bath or shower just before bed, or for a quicker solution, wipe down your neck, face and feet with cold water.
  • Sleep cold. Instead of a hot water bottle, try a cold water bottle, or cold packs in bed. You can also fold up a blanket or your pillowcase and stick it in the fridge during the day. Put it back on the bed just before you go to sleep.

Just for men

  • Be careful about layering. Undershirts or extra layers will just make you sweat more, and they’re harder to change discreetly, so we don’t recommend them. If you work in a more casual setting, you can layer sweaters and t-shirts, and take off your top layer if you’re sweating. If you work in a more formal office, avoid layering. Men’s dress clothing tends to be less flexible in what you can take off while still looking professional, so it’s best to choose pieces you can wear comfortably throughout the day.
  • Smarten your jackets. If you’re in an office that requires you to wear a jacket, be clever about what you wear. Go for unlined jackets. Have a tailor add pads to your underarms to protect the outer layers of the jacket from sweat. Choose breathable fabrics; you might be surprised, but lightweight wool is a great choice year-round, not just in cooler months.
  • Tie it up at the last minute. Don’t wear your tie during your commute, and if you can, wear more breathable shoes before you get to the office. Just before you arrive, swap shoes and do up your tie.
  • Avoid bulky underwear. Stay away from bulky boxers or thick fabrics. Instead, try sports underwear that’s light and sweat-wicking.

Just for women

  • We know – it’s the opposite of what we tell men. But women’s fashion is a bit different: No matter how casual or formal your office, women’s dress codes usually permit some layers that you can take off while still looking professional. Wear a tank top under a t-shirt, or a t-shirt under a sweater, and remove the top layer if you get a bit warm.

 

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